Black female WWII unit recognized with congressional honor

Maj. Fannie Griffin McClendon, who is 101 and lives in Arizona, was one of the 850 members of an all-female, Black unit to serve in Europe in World War II.

WASHINGTON, D.C., USA — The House voted Monday to award the only all-female, Black unit to serve in Europe during World War II with the Congressional Gold Medal.

The 422-0 vote follows a long-running campaign to recognize the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion. The Senate passed the legislation last year. The unit, known in short as the Six Triple Eight, was tasked with sorting and routing mail for millions of American service members and civilians. Only a half-dozen of the more than 850 members are still alive.

“It’s overwhelming,” Maj. Fannie Griffin McClendon, who is 101 and lives in Arizona, said when told of the vote. “It’s something I never even thought about it. I don’t know if I can stand this.”

The 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion was credited with solving a growing mail crisis during its stint in England and, upon their return, serving as a role model to generations of Black women who joined the military. FOR MORE

 

gender equity, WOMEN AWARDS, women leaders, womens history, WOMENS LIVES, womens work

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